The Story of The First Black Queen of England

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Princess Sophie Charlotte born in 1744 was the first Black Queen of England.

The Story of The First Black Queen of England

Unbeknownst to most, Charlotte North Carolina has a rich history steeped in black history.

The Queen City was founded in 1768 and named for Queen Charlotte!

Her African bloodline in the British royal family is not common knowledge.

Portraits of the Queen had been reduced to fiction of the Black Magi, until two art historians suggested that the definite African features of the paintings derived from actual subjects, not the minds of painters Sophie Charlotte was descended directly from an African branch of the Portuguese Royal House, Margarita de Castro y Sousa.

In Queen Charlotte’s era slavery was prevalent and the anti-slavery campaign was growing.

Portrait painters of the royal family were expected to play down or soften Queen Charlotte’s African features.

Ramsey’s inclination to paint truer versions of the Queen could be seen to have come from being ‘an anti-slavery intellectual of his day.

The only private writings that have survived are Queen Charlotte’s 444 letters to her closest confidant her older brother, Charles II, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Strelitz.

On 23 May 1773 in a letter, the Queen felt she was in a position of privilege yet a task.

Her Christian faith was a protection and a method of endurance, as she quotes from the Bible and recognizes her role as a royal of God beyond her royal role on earth.

An exhibition took place in 2004, at the Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace displaying Charlotte and George’s collections and tastes in the arts.

Queen Charlotte was the great great-great grandmother of the present Queen Elizabeth II who still lives in the expanded Buckingham House, now Buckingham Palace.

Six different lines can be traced from Princess Sophie Charlotte back to Margarita de Castro y Sousa.

She married George III of England on September 8, 1761, at the Chapel Royal in St James’s Palace, London, at the age of 17 years of age becoming the Queen of England and Ireland.

Charlotte was the eighth child of the Prince of Mirow, Germany, Charles Louis Frederick, and his wife, Elisabeth Albertina of Saxe-Hildburghausen.

In 1752, when she was eight years old, Sophie Charlotte’s father died.

Their were conditions in the contract for marriage, ‘The young princess, join the Anglican church and be married according to Anglican rites, and never ever involve herself in politics’.

Although the Queen had an interest in what was happening in the world, especially the war in America, she fulfilled her marital agreement.

The Royal couple had fifteen children, thirteen of whom survived to adulthood.

Their fourth eldest son was Edward Augustus, Duke of Kent, later fathered Queen Victoria.

The Coronation painting by Ramsey, of the Queen was sent out to the colonies/commonwealth and played a subtle political role in the anti-slavery movement.

Johann Zoffany also frequently painted the Royal family in informal family scenes.

These portraits are amongst those that are available to view now, which could be seen as continuing the political interests of those that disapprove of a multi-racial royal family for Britain. Sir Allan Ramsey produced the most African representations of the Queen and was responsible for the majority of the paintings of the Queen.

Queen Charlotte was a learned character, her letters indicate that she was well read and had interests in the fine arts.

The Queen is known to have supported and been taught music by Johann Christian Bach.

She was extremely generous to Bach’s wife after Bach’s death. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, at aged eight dedicated his Opus 3 piece to the Queen at her request.

Also an amateur botanist, Queen Charlotte helped to establish Kew Gardens bringing amongst others the Strelitzia Reginae, a flowering plant from South Africa.

The Queen who had the first one in her house in 1800 introduced the Christmas tree to England. It was said to be decorated with, ‘sweetmeats, almonds and raisins in papers, fruit and toys.

Also the Queen Charlotte Maternity hospital was established in London. Set up as a charitable institution, it is the oldest maternity care institution in England.

The Queen died on November 17, 1818 at The Dutch House in Surrey, now Kew Palace, in the presence of her eldest son, the Prince Regent, who was holding her hand as she sat in an armchair at the family’s country retreat, Dutch House in Surrey (now known as Kew Palace).

She was buried at St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle.

Her husband died just over a year later. She is the second longest-serving consort in British history (after the present Duke of Edinburgh), having served as such from her marriage (on 8 September 1761) to her death (17 November 1818), a total of 57 years and 70 days.

Her eldest son, the Prince Regent, claimed Charlotte’s jewels at her death, but the rest of her property was sold at auction from May to August 1819. Her clothes, furniture, and even her snuff were sold by Christie’s.

It is highly unlikely that her husband ever knew of her death. He died blind, deaf, lame and insane 14 months later.

Legacy
Places named after her include the Queen Charlotte Islands (now known as Haida Gwaii) in British Columbia, Canada, and Queen Charlotte City on Haida Gwaii; Queen Charlotte Sound (not far from the Haida Gwaii Islands); Queen Charlotte Bay in West Falkland; Queen Charlotte Sound, South Island, New Zealand; several fortifications, including Fort Charlotte, Saint Vincent; Charlottesville, Virginia; Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island; Charlotte, North Carolina; Mecklenburg County, North Carolina; Mecklenburg County, Virginia; Charlotte County, Virginia and Charlotte Harbor, Florida.

The proposed North American colonies of Vandalia (because of her supposed Vandal ancestry;and Charlotina were also named for her.

Queen Street, or Lebuh Queen as it is known in Malay, is a major street in Penang, Malaysia named after her. In Tonga, the royal family adopted the name Sālote (Tongan version of Charlotte) in her honour, and notable individuals included Sālote Lupepauʻu and Sālote Tupou III.

Her provision of funding to the General Lying-in Hospital in London prevented its closure; today it is named Queen Charlotte’s and Chelsea Hospital, and is an acknowledged centre of excellence amongst maternity hospitals.

The Story of The First Black Queen of England

The Story of The First Black Queen of England

A large copy of the Allan Ramsay portrait of Queen Charlotte hangs in the main lobby of the hospital.

A statue of Queen Charlotte stands in Queen Square in Bloomsbury, London, and at the Charlotte/Douglas International Airport in Charlotte, North Carolina.

The Story of The First Black Queen of England

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